It can be difficult to recognise when you are in an abusive relationship and remove yourself from that relationship, which you may have come to rely on. 

One in four women, and one in six men, will be affected by domestic abuse in their lifetime. When people think of domestic abuse, they often focus on domestic violence. But domestic abuse occurs whenever one person in an intimate relationship tries to dominate and control the other person. Abuse can take the form of physical, emotional, sexual and financial abuse. It is recognised that once someone realises they are in such a relationship finding a way out, or knowing what to do next can be confusing and daunting.

 

You can find out more about healthy and unhealthy relationships on the Victim Support website. Victim Support work from AskBU at The Base on a regular basis so accessing support from them couldn't be easier. They have confidential offices where you can have an open, confidential discussion. Contact AskBU to find out when they are available or contact Victim Support for immediate support.

 

Specialist sources of support

If you are experiencing domestic abuse, don’t suffer in silence. The National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) provides a free, fast emergency injunction service to survivors of domestic violence regardless of their financial circumstances, race, gender or sexual orientation.

Refuge is a spescilaist charity supporting women and children affected by domestic violence. Their website includes informaiton on how to recognise abuse and how to get control of your life back. They have a helpline you can call and can provide help with the legal options available to you.

 

Support available at BU

SUBU Advice is here to help and can point you in the right direction for specialist advice and support. We can also advise you on relevant SUBU and BU Policies and Procedures, e.g. exceptional circumstances, formally known as mitigating circumstances. BU provides a Wellbeing service and staff in the Chaplaincy are also qualified to provide students with emotional support. You can also speak to your GP, friends, family and/or the Samaritans. Each Faculty also has a Student Support and Engagement Team who can provide you with advice and support. Contact the service/s you feel most comfortable approaching.

 

If you feel you or a friend are in immediate danger please call 999

 

Reaching out after an assault can be daunting and we understand the courage it may take to do this. SUBU Advice is here to help and can point you in the right direction for specialist advice and support and, where necessary, advise you on relevant SUBU and BU Policies and Procedures, e.g. mitigating circumstances.

If you have been assaulted, or know someone who has, then you can contact one of these services below. If you would like advice with regards to your personal safety you can call the police by dialling 101. In an emergency you should always call 999.

 

BU has a Counselling Service and staff in Chaplaincy are also qualified to provide students with emotional support. You can also access support via your Faculty Student Engagement and Support Coordinator. Don’t forget, you can also speak to your GP, friends, family and the Samaritans.

 

Specialist Sources of Support

Dorset Rape Crisis Support Centre is a voluntary organisation run for men, women, young people over 16 who have been raped or sexually abused.

 

The dedicated Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC) for Dorset, providing a comprehensive service to men, women and children who have been raped or sexually assaulted.

 

Victim Support have some really useful information on their website and you can also contact them for support.

 

Not sure who to contact? There is no right or wrong organisation to get in touch with. Check the opening times for each and what they can they offer to you, e.g. 24 hours support, face-to-face support, male/female workers etc.... Chose the one which you feel can best meets your needs.